Forum Index

 
  Web Games Web Games     Download Games Download Games     My Page My Page     Treats & Prizes Treats & Prizes     Help Help
  FAQFAQ     SearchSearch   ProfileProfile

Culinary Word Game
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... , 80, 81, 82  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic     Forum Index -> General Chit-Chat
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
mamavan



Joined: 19 Dec 2009
Posts: 879

PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 6:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MANDARIN CHICKEN -
Back to top
PETUNIA77



Joined: 18 Mar 2009
Posts: 1408

PostPosted: Tue Sep 06, 2011 5:21 pm    Post subject: CULINARY WORD GAME... Reply with quote

NAUGHTY BISCOTTI

http://www.naughtybiscotti.com/cookies.html


Back to top
mamavan



Joined: 19 Dec 2009
Posts: 879

PostPosted: Tue Sep 06, 2011 6:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

IRISH COFFEE - Irish coffee (Irish: Caife Gaelach) is a cocktail consisting of hot coffee, Irish whiskey, and sugar, stirred, and topped with thick cream.
Back to top
FriscoGirl



Joined: 01 Dec 2009
Posts: 1395

PostPosted: Tue Sep 20, 2011 2:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

EEL SUSHI (unagi)



Eel is not part of the original Edo style sushi menu. The reason for this is that Edo (old name of Tokyo) was famous for its fast food industry specializing in Edo style sushi, tempura, soba, and unagi, or eel was no exception. During the Edo period, eel were abundant in the Tokyo area and had a cuisine called the Edomae Unagi. Many unagi chefs existed during the Edo period (a few of them still presently exist throughout Japan) and it was considered a separate profession since it required much skill. Sushi chefs wouldn’t dare to sell eel prepared by themselves because they knew they couldn't beat the taste and would make a fool out of themselves. Renowned sushi restaurants in would usually buy prepared eel from professional unagi chefs.

Eel is a difficult fish to prepare. It is cooked when used as sushi, and never eaten raw. It has a sweet, but earthy aroma, and if it is prepared improperly, the flesh can smell, and become very tough and rubbery. The eel is first filleted, and then grilled on open flame. This gets rid of excess fat under the skin, which is where the unpleasant scent mostly comes from. Then it is steamed to make the meat fluffy and to further drain out the oils. After this, it is once again grilled on open flame while basting it many times with eel sauce (unagi no tare) which is made from the eel trimmings, soy sauce, sugar, and sake (rice wine).

Eel should be soft, fluffy, and very flaky. It is mild in fat even after the grilling and steaming, and that is what a good eel should taste like. It is pleasant on the palate and should never have a fishy or earthy aftertaste. Crushed Japanese green pepper corn called sansho is often served with eel at eel restaurants. While this is not usually used in sushi restaurants, it stimulates the sweet taste of the eel.
Back to top
PETUNIA77



Joined: 18 Mar 2009
Posts: 1408

PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2011 4:10 pm    Post subject: CULINARY WORD GAME... Reply with quote

OK...WORKING WITH FRISCOGIRL'S LETTER "I" FROM SUSHI...

AND BECAUSE IT IS NOW OFFICIALLY AUTUMN...HOW ABOUT...


INDIAN CORN...





Better known in England as sweet corn. Can be eaten on the cob, creamed or plain. Cobs are up to 8 inches long and grow in a green husk on a plant about 6 ft high with pointed green leaves. The kernels provide the raw material for maize, hominy, polenta and cornflour when dried, but are soft and milky when cooked as green corn.
Back to top
mamavan



Joined: 19 Dec 2009
Posts: 879

PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2011 7:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Neufchâtel Cheese -


The French original, hailing from the town of Neufchâtel in the region of Normandy, is a soft, white, unripened cheese. When young, its flavor is slightly salty but delicate and mild. After ripening, Neufchâtel becomes more pungent. It's made from cows' milk and the milk fat content varies widely (from 20 to 45 percent). Neufchâtel is available in a variety of shapes — square, rectangular, cylindrical and the special heart-shape variety called Coeur de Bray .
Back to top
CathieC



Joined: 29 Jul 2008
Posts: 269

PostPosted: Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Egg Nog
Back to top
PETUNIA77



Joined: 18 Mar 2009
Posts: 1408

PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2011 12:31 pm    Post subject: CULINARY WORD GAME... Reply with quote

BIG BUMP!!!!!!

WELL, WITH THANKSGIVING HERE IN A FEW DAYS...

GIBLET GRAVY



HAPPY THANKSGIVING!! Very Happy Very Happy
Back to top
FriscoGirl



Joined: 01 Dec 2009
Posts: 1395

PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2011 10:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Going with the Thanksgiving theme


YAMS

Back to top
PETUNIA77



Joined: 18 Mar 2009
Posts: 1408

PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2011 11:50 pm    Post subject: CULINARY WORD GAME... Reply with quote

SUCCOTASH






Succotash "boiled corn kernels" is a food dish consisting primarily of corn and lima beans or other shell beans. Other ingredients may be added including tomatoes and green or sweet red peppers. Because of the relatively inexpensive and more readily available ingredients, the dish was popular during the Great Depression in the United States. It was sometimes cooked in a casserole form, often with a light pie crust on top as in a traditional pot pie. Succotash is a traditional dish of many Thanksgiving celebrations in New England as well as in Pennsylvania and other states. In some parts of the American South, any mixture of vegetables prepared with lima beans and topped with lard or butter is called succotash.
Back to top
mamavan



Joined: 19 Dec 2009
Posts: 879

PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2011 8:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

HEAVENLY HASH -



vanilla and chocolate ice cream filled with white vanilla marshmallow swirls, chopped almonds, and dark chocolate chunks.
Back to top
PETUNIA77



Joined: 18 Mar 2009
Posts: 1408

PostPosted: Thu Dec 01, 2011 10:37 am    Post subject: CULINARY WORD GAME... Reply with quote

well, it's only 24 degrees fahrenheit outside my house...so...

HOT COCOA

i prefer mine homemade with marshmallows...mmmm










MARSHMALLOW MUSTACHE!!!!!!!!!!!! LOL!
Back to top
g8rmom



Joined: 29 Aug 2011
Posts: 143

PostPosted: Fri Dec 02, 2011 12:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ambrosia
Back to top
FriscoGirl



Joined: 01 Dec 2009
Posts: 1395

PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2011 1:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Artichoke



The globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus var. scolymus) is a perennial thistle of the Cynara genus originating in Southern Europe around the Mediterranean. It grows to 4.6–6.6 ft tall, with arching, deeply lobed, silvery, glaucous-green leaves 20–32 in long. The flowers develop in a large head from an edible bud about 3.1–5.9 in diameter with numerous triangular scales; the individual florets are purple. The edible portion of the buds consists primarily of the fleshy lower portions of the involucral bracts and the base, known as the "heart"; the mass of immature florets in the center of the bud is called the "choke" or beard. These are inedible in older larger flowers.

The origin of artichokes is unknown, though they are said to have come from the Maghreb (North Africa), where they are still found in the wild state; the seeds of artichokes, probably cultivated, were found during the excavation of Roman-period Mons Claudianus in Egypt. Names for the artichoke in many European languages come from the Arabic الخرشوف al-khurshūf. Artichokes were cultivated in Sicily since the time of the ancient Greeks, the Greeks calling them kaktos. In this period, the leaves and flower heads, which cultivation had already improved from the wild form, were eaten. The Romans, who called the vegetable carduus, received the plant from the Greeks. Globe artichokes are known to have been cultivated at Naples around the middle of the 9th century.
Back to top
PETUNIA77



Joined: 18 Mar 2009
Posts: 1408

PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2011 6:55 pm    Post subject: CULINARY WORD GAME... Reply with quote

EXTRACT





DRAWING FLAVORS FROM CERTAIN FOODS...USED TO FLAVOR OTHER FOOD ITEMS...
Back to top
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic     Forum Index -> General Chit-Chat All times are GMT - 4 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... , 80, 81, 82  Next
Page 81 of 82

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group